More Than Just Spanish, Finding Interpreters for Indigenous Mexican Languages

(Image from the Florentine Codex, a 2400 page document from the 16th centry that included the first romanization of the Nahuatl language, known informally as Aztec and spoken today by 1.5 million people in central Mexico.)

In Mexico there are 11 language families, 68 indigenous languages, and 364 linguistic variants. When individuals from Mexico come to the United States to find work or a better opportunity for their families they aren’t just speaking Spanish. Speakers of languages like Triqui and Mixteco often do not speak any Spanish making their time here in the U.S. challenging. In the following stories from the California Report and National Public Radio you can learn a bit more about the difficulties facing speakers of indigenous Mexican languages, their employers and hospitals where they are provided medical care without understanding what treatment they are being provided.

 

And here is the story, picked up nationally by NPR:

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/09/29/444223248/hospitals-struggle-to-help-farmworkers-who-speak-triqui-or-mixteco

 

Contact Translation By Design for document translation and Indigenous Mexican Language Interpreters for the following languages:

Nahuatl, Yucatec Maya, Zapotec, Mixtec, Mayo, Yaqui, Tzeltal, Tzotzil, Chol, Totonac, Purépecha, Otomi, Mazahua, Mazatec, Chinantec, Mixe, Zoque, Popoluca, Popoloca language, Me'phaa, Wixarika, Naayerite, Tepehuán, Warihio, Raramuri, Seri, Chontal Maya, Chontal, Huave, Pame, Teenek, Kickapoo, Kiliwa, Paipai, Cucapá, Amuzgo, Triqui, Lacandon Maya, Mam Maya, Jakaltek, Matlatzinca, Tepehua, Chichimeca Jonaz, Pima Bajo, Ngiwa, Ixcatec, Ayapanec, and other indigenous Mexican languages